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Dating tiffany silver marks

It is on an old meat fork and says STERLING with an M in a simple shield flanked by 2 birds, presumably eagles.

From 1929 to 1932, the Kalo Shop changed the mark to STERLING / HAND WROUGHT / THE KALO SHOP / CHICAGO / U. It may have been added for reasons of national pride, but nobody is certain.Silver is a “precious metal” and as such it was heavily regulated throughout its history and until very recent times. Silver and silver items were regarded as part of the National Treasure or Federal Reserve of many countries and authorities devised copious methods of assessing its value and also constantly monitored the overall quantity of available silver within the national borders at any given time, whether in the form of raw silver ingots or silver jewelry and artifacts.Part of the reason was that Silver could be easily converted to currency or be used as a valuable bargaining or bartering resource in trading with other nations, such as allies and those who had other commodities to exchange that would be vital at war or times of crisis.I have checked all my books and I can not find any referemce to this maker. the workmanship is incredible, but I would love to know more.submitted by Carol Kelley I have acquired a beautiful bracelet and necklace of silver filigree, large blue topaz and a center of a cameo.The marks on the bottom of a piece of silver can be an indication of the age, maker, and origin of the piece.A single mark usually indicates that the piece of silver was made in America, although there are some Irish and Scottish pieces with just the maker’s name.Usually, only one or two of these silver hallmarks are the actual makers marks of the silversmith or artist.Countries most notorious for requiring all these silver marks include Great Britain, France and Germany.If the king’s head faces right, it was made before 1850. The word STERLING indicates Ireland as well as America.COIN, DOLLAR, and STANDARD were usually American terms, but some Irish makers also used them.

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